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Large Print Wide Margin Text Only Bible from CBP

Large Print Wide Margin Text Only Bible from CBP

 

 

One of my favorite Bible formats, my preferred in fact, is a wide margin and, today, I am reviewing one of the best wide margin Bible available, the Large Print Wide Margin Text Bible from Church Bible Publishers {CBP}. (Disclosure: This Bible was not provided by CBP, neither did they solicit this review. This is on my own and at my own cost)

Bible Photos

A comment or two on Church Bible Publishers

Church Bible Publishers is based in Cadillac, Michigan and are owned and operated by a local church pastor and former missionary. If you follow them on social media, you will see that they still have a missionary zeal for getting the Word of God into the hands of the people.

 

ALL CBP Bibles are printed and bound in the United States, a rare feature in the realm of Bible Publishing. These Bibles tend to be much higher quality than their internationally printed counterparts, most if which tend to be printed in China. CBP has a video on YouTube showing actual production of CBP Bibles, including multiple quality checks along the way. One fact, when dealing with CBP, is that they hold the Bible in highest regard, no, they cherish the Bible. Each Bible is unique as is each reader of the Bible.

 

 

Translation

CBP is a dedicated King James Bible Publisher. In their case, I really appreciate this fact because it enables them to focus on the quality of the Bible they produce and give both the Bible itself and the reader the honor deserved.

 

Cover and Binding

This is a black lambskin cover with edge to edge synthetic leather lining. Generally, lambskin is the softest and most supple leather you can find. It is also a more tender leather and will need daily handling to prevent it from drying out.

 

CBP has ironed the lambskin so that it is very supple. I love a good grain on my Bible, especially pebble grain, but here that would be somehow disrespectful. There is a bit of sheen to it that will eventually turn into a nice patina, although I am not sure how obvious it would be since the Bible is black.

 

The liner, as I mentioned, is billed as synthetic but I have to say that does not impact the limpness or flexibility in the slightest. It most likely adds to the durability since lambskin is so delicate.

 

CBP sews all their Bibles, a testament to the quality they provide. The company is run by a group of local church pastors, if you had not already guessed from the name, and they know the demands placed on a pastor’s Bible hence the sewn binding. A sewn binding guarantees a lifetime of use and I wager the leather will need replaced long before the stitching.

 

Layout and Font

We have a 12-point font in a double column verse by verse format with 1.75 inch margins.  It is a pure text edition meaning there are no helps, not even translator’s footnotes. It is obvious that this format is designed for pulpit use or for the classroom.

 

CBP has given us one of the best red-letter editions available. The red is crisp and a deep rich cherry color. I tested the red under the brightest, most unforgiving light I could find, the Arizona Sun, and had absolutely no issues. You will, no doubt, have no issues under the lights on your platform.

 

Paper

This is around a 36 gsm white paper. It is fairly thick and makes for easy page turning. It is nicely opaque; I did not notice any bleed through with my pen.

 

For marking, I recommend that a colored pencil be your first choice; Prang is the brand I use. For ball-point pen I suggest Pilot Pen Company’s Better Retractable brand pen. Pilot gives, in my experience, the most consistent ink flow and does not leave the annoying pen impressions on the other side of the page.

 

Helps

The only study aid provided is a double column concordance. It seems to mirror the Cambridge Concordance and provides a fairly comprehensive index for study.

 

Compared to my other lambskin KJV

I have one other lambskin KJV (which I think was also done by CBP), a wide margin Classic KJV Study Bible, a special edition from the KJV Store. The leather feels identical, leading me to believe they are from the same source.

 

The look and feel of the paper is also very similar and the writing experience also seems to be the same.

 

I treat these as companions. The Classic Study Bible is by my bedside for evening reading and the Large Print Wide Margin is in my rotation for lesson prep.

 

As an Every Day Use Bible

This is not a small Bible, most large print Bibles are not. It runs a little on the heavy side at about 3.5 pounds, so frequent one-handed use may be impractical. All CBP Bibles are pulpit ready, their large print even more so, since as a teacher you should be using the largest font size possible in the classroom.

 

I have begun some markings but have not decided which categories of annotations I will add; generally I do word studies and sermon points. If I do it correctly, I can preach most, if not all texts, with nothing else than the marginal annotations.

 

A little more about caring for this unique leather

I want to add a couple tips for caring for lambskin as it tends to be a more delicate leather.

  • Don’t wash your hands immediately before handling this Bible. The oils from your hands work into the leather keeping it rich and supple.
  • Use Lexol when cleaning the Bible cover. It removes dirt but still nourishes the leather and keeps it supple
  • Handle this Bible regularly if it is not your primary Bible. Remember that the natural oils in your skin will work into the leather. Each Bible will have a unique shine because of your natural oils.

 

The Price Point

CBP sells their Bibles at cost or as close to it as possible. This Bible will run you about $75-$85 before taxes and shipping, depending on if you have a coupon.

 

Should you buy this Bible

The Large Print Wide Margin Text Bible is for you if you are looking for an unadulterated text block with plenty of room for your annotations.

 

If you are a Bible Teacher, in any capacity, then you should consider this edition.

NIV Preacher’s Bible Review

NIV Preacher’s Bible Review

 

 

Zondervan’s NIV Preacher’s Bible is the NIV that many pastors have been desirous of for a long time. Does it stack up? Before we answer that let me disclose that Zondervan provided this Bible free of charge in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are my own.

 

Preacher’s Bible Photos

 

We will go a little out of order in this review. Let’s begin:

Font

Sadly, the font is the area where I have to complain. While it is comfort print and would be fairly easy on the eyes for most people, it is rather small. Zondervan lists at 9.5 but I would put money on that being the font size with leading.  I cannot, for the life of me, understand why a “preacher’s Bible” has a font size smaller than 11-point. Your preaching Bible really ought to have as large a font as possible so that you are not needing to squint while trying to preach. Zondervan’s sister company, Thomas Nelson uses an 11.5-point font and a true 11.5 at that. It does make for a thicker Bible but I would call that a worthwhile trade off. Incidentally, the Preacher’s Bible has a cousin in the Large Print Thin-line which does have an 11-point font (in paragraph format).

I would like to point out that readability is helped out by line matching the text on both sides of the page.

Cover and Binding

This is without a doubt the best goatskin that Harper Collins (Zondervan’s Parent) has offered in the Premier Collection. The grain is very pronounced and quite delightful to the touch. We have an edge lined cover and a sewn binding.

It is a black goatskin that, I think, rivals current offerings from Cambridge. Harper Collins has really stepped up their game here. The goatskin is not quite on the level of R.L. Allan or Schuyler but you get very good quality for the price point.

Paper

This is a 36 gsm Indopaque paper. It is quite a bit higher gsm than in the NASB Preacher’s Bible that Zondervan offers. It is a crisp bright white, a considerable help to readability given the smallish font. The paper is nicely opaque and should hold up to annotations rather well. Always start with colored pencil or ball-point pen somewhere in the back of the Bible until you arrive at what works well for you.

Layout, Pagination, Intended Solution

Normally, I put the layout with the font but this is a unique NIV so the layout gets moved.

This is the only verse-by-verse layout offered in the NIV. Like the paper, this aids in readability to offset the smallish font. Verse numbers are set apart, as you will see  in the photos. They are more obvious than in the NASB cousin and makes it incredibly easy to find the verse that you are looking for.

Like what Zondervan did with the NASB Preacher’s Bible, the NIV Preacher’s Bible has the same pagination as the NIV Comfort Print Pew and Worship Bible- every page begins and ends with the same word in each Bible.

The Preacher’s Bible and Pew & Worship Bible offerings, in either translation solve a major problem for many pastors, myself included- having everyone on the same page, literally. In my younger days, I did not understand how few people had actually gotten inside a Bible and thought that pew Bibles were promoting laziness. These days, however, I realize just how many Christians are entirely unfamiliar with the Bible. The Preacher’s Bible paired with the Pew and Worship Bible allows the pastor to tell the congregation on which page to find the text for either the responsive reading or the day’s sermon.

Compared to my current NIV

Currently, I am using the Giant Print Reference Bible for preaching and will probably continue to do so given that it has a 13.5 font vs 9.5, even though it is a paragraph format. That is not to say that I will not use the Preacher’s Bible. It really is a very nice Bible and very helpful. More on usage in the next section.

The NIV Preacher’s Bible has the advantage on cover material, it is goatskin where the Giant Print Reference Bible is a bonded leather. It also has better paper. In truth, if it were easier to read, it would be the ideal NIV. Note: Most people will not have an issue reading the Preacher’s Bible, I just happen to be rather nearsighted.

Usage with distribution Bibles

We have two Bible distribution platforms at Abounding Grace Baptist Church, one of which distributes pew Bibles. We will be transitioning to distributing the Pew and Worship Bible along with placing them at the church. This will solve the issue of helping new disciples to learn the Bible. In so doing we will be able to tell parishioners where to find the day’s text.

For Carry

At less than an inch thick,  this Bible is very well suited to carry. It will easily fit into a laptop back, executive portfolio, or other such carrying item. The weight is negligible.

The Preacher’s Bible Compared with Large Print Thin-line

Overall, these two Premier Collection Bibles are fairly evenly matched. Aesthetically, the cover on the Preacher’s Bible is my preference. The Preacher’s Bible  has a much more pronounced grain and is more pleasing to the touch than the Large Print Thin-line, which is not to say that the Thin-line is not delightful to the touch, it just happens that enjoying a fairly pronounced grain is one of my quirky little oddities.

To my eyes (and your experience may be different), the Large Print Thin-line has the advantage in font size. Paragraph format is not my favorite format but it is what I am used to with the NIV and I confess the 11-point font is easier on my eyes.

Comparing with the NASB Preacher’s Bible

The two are nearly identical, not counting the translation. The NASB has a larger font by around half a point but that does not really affect readability of either. The big differentiator is the NIV makes the verses quite a bit more obvious and, if you own both, you may find verse navigation easier in the NIV.

Final Thoughts

The font is a problem for me. I hate complaining about a Bible but I did say I would give an honest review. I will overcome the font issue, for as long as possible, because it provides a solution for me as a pastor.

Overall, this is a really well-crafted Bible. Most pastors who preach from NIV will really benefit from this Bible. It is, after all, the NIV Bible that many, many pastors have wanted for a long time.

I hope that Zondervan will release other verse-by-verse Bibles in the future. Verse-by-verse tends to be the most practical format for preaching and it has become clear that Zondervan has realized this fact. I hope they will expand their offerings, at the least for pastors if not for the entire market.

NIV Giant Print Reference Bible Review

NIV Giant Print Reference Bible Review

 

The New International Version is one of the two best-selling English Translations of the Bible and I have enjoyed reviewing a number of them. This time around I am reviewing the Giant Print Reference Bible with Comfort Print, which you may recall seeing in my pulpit. Note: Unlike other Bibles, Zondervan did not provide this Bible for review. It was acquired at my own expense.

Additional Pictures

 

Cover and Binding

When selecting this Bible, I opted for the Burgundy Bonded Leather edition as it was the highest quality cover that is available. It has a paste down liner, making it a little stiff. The stiffness is not too bad and, as all leathers do, it will soften up a bit over time. If you plan to make this a daily Bible, know that bonded leathers tend to need their covers replaced after 5-10 years, sometimes more and sometimes less depending on the quality of the base leather used in the bonding process.

 

This Bible does have a sewn Binding. For the purposes that I have selected this Bible, a sewn binding was absolutely essential, otherwise it would be useless within about 36 months.

 

Paper, Layout, Font

The paper is fairly crisp white. There is mild reflection in bright light but nothing that would irritating. It features half-moon style thumb indexing. I realize that many dislike this feature but I find it almost necessary to my purposes. I did memorize the order of the books of the Bible way back in second grade but in the pulpit, indexing makes for faster access to the text needed. I would say that the paper is sufficiently opaque for marking and, as I tend to do, I recommend the use of ball point pen for marking.

 

The text is laid out in double column paragraph format; translators footnotes are in a column at the bottom right corner of the page. The verse numbers are both large enough and dark enough to find with relative ease.

 

The Comfort Print font is extremely well done in this edition. The black letter portion is a deeper richer ebony than you find in many of Zondervan’s other Bibles. The red letters really impress me, especially at this Bible’s price point. In far too many cases, red-letter Bibles turn pink but not so here. The red is very well done, consistent, deep, rich and most importantly, easily readable in the pulpit.

 

For Preaching

I have a few NIV, including the Premier Collection Large Print Thin-line (11-point font) which is a phenomenal choice for preaching. However, middle age and diabetes wear on my eyes, leading me to reach for the 13.5 font size in the Giant Print.

 

It is a very versatile Bible. I tend to be peripatetic and this edition is very well balanced for one handed use. The Giant Print edition also works out well on the pulpit in that it does not add to eye strain when laid on the pulpit for reading.

 

In many reference Bibles, the references can be found in center column and that is the format I am most used to. However, the end-of-verse reference format is far preferable to a center column format as the references are still available for rapid use but do not get in the way of the flow of reading the text.

 

Helps

The NIV Giant Print Reference Bible offers a limited scope of helps, a fact which I find refreshing. There are so many NIV Bibles, covering a wide range of needs, with multiple helps that it is quite a relief that we get the essential helps but not a ton more.

 

Cross-References

The cross-references are located following the verse, hence the moniker End-of-Verse references. The reference system in this particular Bible is a condensed version of the Zondervan Reference System, around 12,500 references or so. It is rare for me to use references in sermon prep though there have been situations where I had forgotten a passage I wanted to reference and seeing the reference jogged my memory.

 

Lined Notes Pages

Lined Notes Pages? I am delighted. The presence of lined notes pages begins to answer my wish that every Bible included them. We get about a half dozen pages, certainly not enough for sermon notes but more than adequate for more important notes like the Romans Road etc. If Zondervan would give me my way, they would release an edition of this Bible with 4-5 lined notes pages per book. Pastor’s write in our Bibles, why not have sufficient room.

 

Dictionary Concordance

A condensed version of John Kohlenberger’s excellent concordance is provided for us. Key terms are defined and then given the corresponding textual references for further study.

 

Final Thoughts

I am quite pleased with this Bible. For the price point, you get a very good value for the money. I would like it to have a higher grade leather but that is a niggling little detail easily corrected by a re-binder.

 

I would tweak a few things but they are more aesthetic than utilitarian. I realize that an NIV Preaching Bible is forthcoming in the near future (I am already committed to review) and I think it will be excellent but for preaching, the Giant Print NIV really knocks it out of the park. At its price-point, this Bible is well done and well worth the money.

 

A special note to my pastor brethren: In the pulpit, one should have the largest font possible without forfeiting practicality. If you are preaching from NIV, this is an excellent choice.