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Tag: colossians

Word Nuggets in Colossians 1

Word Nuggets in Colossians 1

As we are studying the Book of Colossians, we will come across some very important terms with which you should be familiar. In chapter one they are:

 

Jesus Christ

(Gk. Iesous Christos) (1:1; Matt. 1:1, 18; Mark 1:1; John 1:17; 17:3; 1 Cor. 1:2–10) Strong’s #2424; 5547: “Jesus Christ” is not the first and last names of Jesus, as people are commonly named today. Jesus is His human name, whose meaning relates to His mission to save us (see Matt. 1:18). Christ is a description of His office: He is “the Anointed One,” anointed by God to be our King, Prophet, and High Priest. The combination of name and title is rare in the Gospels (occurring only five times) because Jesus was still in the process of revealing Himself as the Christ. Once this was recognized by His followers, the combination was used prolifically throughout the Book of Acts and the Epistles to express the belief that Jesus is the Christ, the promised Messiah. Paul uses the combined form at the start of Colossians to indicate the theme of his letter, the supremacy of Jesus Christ.

1:4 faith

(Gr. pistis) (Acts 17:31; 1 Cor. 13:13; Gal. 5:6; 2 Tim. 4:7) G4102: In the New Testament, this term is always used with reference to religious matters. Basically, faith is trusting in the God whom one is convinced is trustworthy. The Bible declares, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen” (Heb. 11:1). True faith is the means of obtaining a right relationship with God (Rom. 1:17; Eph. 2:8; James 2:14). On several occasions, this term can mean “faithfulness, trustworthiness”—especially when used in connection with other virtues (Matt. 23:23; Rom. 3:3; Gal. 5:22). The expression “the faith” may be used to denote Christianity (Gal. 1:23; 1 Tim. 4:1; Jude 3).

1:11 strengthen

(Gr. dynamoō) G1412: This verb is one of many terms in the New Testament that falls within the broad domain of power language. It can be translated “to strengthen, enable, endow.” This word is in the passive voice with God as the agent strengthening His people. It is paired with other power words (might and power). In the Septuagint, the man who strengthens himself and does not make God his strength is the object of laughter (Ps. 52:6, 7). Two passages of the Septuagint employ this verb to denote the strengthening of things—one time by God (Ps. 68:28; Dan. 9:27).

 

1:15 image

eikōn; Strong’s #1504: Likeness, appearance, form. That which is depicted or shaped to look like its subject, as in the head of a king on a coin or in a marble sculpture; something that accurately represents and shows its subject in its form, such as man of God (1 Cor. 7:7) or man of Adam (1 Cor. 15:49). Paul emphasizes our destiny is to show the likeness of the “heavenly Man” in our lives (1 Cor. 15:49). Jesus is the representative form or appearance of God (2 Cor. 4:4; Col. 1:15).

1:15 creation

(Gr. ktisis) (Col. 1:23; Heb. 9:11; Rev. 3:14) G2937: In biblical Greek, this term primarily refers to the divine act of creation or to the thing(s) created (Rom. 1:20, 25; 8:19–22, 39; Heb. 4:13). Creation marks the beginning of this present age—a fact acknowledged even by the last-days scoffers of the Second Coming (Mark 10:6; 13:19; 2 Pet. 3:4). Twice, the Pauline epistles employ this term in the rabbinical sense of someone being designated a “new creation” upon coming to God (2 Cor. 5:17; Gal. 6:15). In an unusual biblical use of the term (but in keeping with secular usage), Peter refers to a humanly produced governing authority (1 Pet. 2:13).

1:29 working

(Gr. energeia) (Eph. 4:16; Phil. 3:21; 2 Thess. 2:9) G1753: This word, related to the English word “energy,” is translated “working, operation, action, activity.” It occurs only in the Pauline epistles where it is used only of superhuman beings and is always accompanied by other “power terms.” The working of God includes His empowering Paul for ministry and His raising Christ from the dead (Eph. 1:19; 3:7; Col. 1:29; 2:12). Moreover, by His own working, Christ is able to subdue all things to Himself (Phil. 3:21). This term can also be used for the “working of Satan” in his deluding those who perish by using power, signs, and lying wonders (2 Thess. 2:9, 11).

Source Material:

Thes source materials for this lesson are: The NKJV Study Bible, The NKJV Study Bible, and the Spirit Filled Life Bible. All 3 are copyrighted by Thomas Nelson and used by permission.