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NKJV Interleaved Journaling Bible

NKJV Interleaved Journaling Bible

 

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In the journaling Bible realm, Crossway and Tyndale have reigned supreme…until now, that is. Thomas Nelson has come out swinging by launching their own Interleaved journaling Bible in a direct challenge to Crossway and their ESV Interleaf Journaling Bible. Thomas Nelson sent me a review copy free of charge in exchange for an honest review (I was not required to give a positive review, simply an honest one and my opinions are my own.). Let’s see how it stacks up…

 

 

Publisher’s Product Description

“The ultimate note-taking Bible:

The NKJV Journaling Bible, Interleaved Edition is designed for anyone who likes to take copious notes when they are reading God’s Word or following along in a sermon or any other church ministry. Opposite every page that presents Scripture in the New King James Version translation is an entire page left blank for you to fill with notes, art-journaling or whatever creative expression strikes you in a spirit-filled moment of contemplation. This Bible also features the innovative Comfort Print typeface, a carefully designed font that has been tested to minimize eyestrain and thereby prolong your reading experience of God’s special revelation.

Features:

  • Traditional double column Scripture text
  • A blank page inserted between each page of Scripture
  • 2 double-faced satin ribbons
  • Words of Christ in red
  • Sturdy 40gsm paper ideally suited for notetaking
  • Clear and readable 9-point Comfort Print

The Layout

As noted in the description from Nelson, we start with the “traditional” Bible layout. This is a 9-point comfort print font in a double column text. I am glad that the traditional format has been kept here; there is something to be said for familiarity

Every other page is blank, and I mean completely blank, no lines for note taking. This s a compliant I have with moose journaling Bibles- there needs to be ruled lines for note taking.  I understand the logic behind it- many people “art journal” by adding pictures, doodles etc. I supposed that I am a bit of a

purist, or it could just be the pastor in me. I find the blank pages are terrific for placing sermon outlines with the text. As it happens, I am writing a Bible handbook that is geared toward Sunday school teachers and will be adding my notes for that handbook to the interleaved pages in this Bible.

 

Cover and Binding

This is a cloth over board hardcover. It may be my fingers playing a trick on me, but it feels somewhat similar to a burlap sack. It might be on purpose, though, to remind us that repentance should be in sack cloth and ashes. This Bible will hold up very well over the years as book board is very sturdy. I would like to see a higher end cover for pastors who plan to take it into the pulpit and there is a possibility of me having it rebound in calfskin later.

Naturally, we are given a Smythe-sewn binding. A sewn binding is the only logical choice for a Bible which is so clearly intended for heavy usage.

 

Paper and font

Like its competitor from Crossway, the NKJV Interleaved Bible has more of a cream-colored paper than a plain white. This seems to be easier on the eyes and it will certainly cause colors to pop out if you color code your annotations.

Thomas Nelson’s Comfort Print font is really outstanding in this Bible. The font is 9-point Ans, really, you cannot go larger in an interleaved Bible, or you will have an unwieldy juggernaut of a Bible.

 

Suggested Tools for Journaling and Annotating

  1. Papermate Sharpwriter No. 2 Pencil- Unless you are buying multiple copies, you may find yourself wanting to update your notes later in life. The Sharpwriter is my preferred pencil since in lays down a sot but rich grey text which can be easily erased.
  2. Prismacolor Colored Pencils. Many pastors and teachers color code their notes and I, like many other reviewers, recommend Prismacolor. You will get a very rich color on the paper, unlike other brads which happen to be very faint.
  3. Pilot Better Retractable Pen. When using ball-point bens, I recommend Better Retractable from Pilot. Again, you will get a rich color line, but you will not experience show through on the other side.

 

What should I notate?

Pastors and teachers- place notes for sermons, teaching outlines, word studies etc. I suppose that you could put a fill manuscript of sermons but that rather defeats the purpose as you probably cannot script out sermons for every chapter of the Bible.

Other Christians- There are a host options that you can put here. I would start with questions. As you read notate questions you have about the text and leave room to put your answers. Another favorite suggestion would be to hand copy verses you want to remember.

College and Seminary Students- this Bible is ideal for taking notes from your classes.

 

Anything missing?

I would have liked to see wide margins as Crossway did. I also, as mentioned earlier, would have liked to see lined notes pages. I would also like to see a guide for inductive study like Harvest House Publishers does with their Inductive Study Bible.

Final Thoughts

This could easily be my favorite Bible produced by Thomas Nelson. Neither the Bible itself, nor our experience with it, should be stagnant. The Bible is unique in that it, simultaneously, belongs to the Church at Large and the Individual Christian the Interleaved Journaling Bible offers an ideal place to record the record of your walk with the Holy Spirit.

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