Author: Matt Sherro

Answering Tragedy with Worship: The Psalm of Moshe

Answering Tragedy with Worship: The Psalm of Moshe

Psalm 90 (KJV)

90 Lord, thou hast been our dwelling place in all generations.

Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God.

Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men.

For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.

Thou carriest them away as with a flood; they are as a sleep: in the morning they are like grass which groweth up.

In the morning it flourisheth, and groweth up; in the evening it is cut down, and withereth.

For we are consumed by thine anger, and by thy wrath are we troubled.

Thou hast set our iniquities before thee, our secret sins in the light of thy countenance.

For all our days are passed away in thy wrath: we spend our years as a tale that is told.

10 The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.

11 Who knoweth the power of thine anger? even according to thy fear, so is thy wrath.

12 So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

13 Return, O Lord, how long? and let it repent thee concerning thy servants.

14 O satisfy us early with thy mercy; that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.

15 Make us glad according to the days wherein thou hast afflicted us, and the years wherein we have seen evil.

16 Let thy work appear unto thy servants, and thy glory unto their children.

17 And let the beauty of the Lord our God be upon us: and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it.

Word Wealth: Justification (dikaiósis)

Word Wealth: Justification (dikaiósis)

Our first Word Wealth entry comes from Strong’s Dictionary of the Bible and covers what is, perhaps, the most important word for a Christian, justification:

In Greek the word is dikaiósis (δικαίωσις)

dikaiósis: the act of pronouncing righteous, acquittal

Original Word: δικαίωσις, εως, ἡ
Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
Transliteration: dikaiósis
Phonetic Spelling: (dik-ah’-yo-sis)
Short Definition: acquittal, justification
Definition: acquittal, justifying, justification, a process of absolution.

 

This word is used only in Romans 4:25 and Romans 5:18. It focuses on the acquitted penalty by receiving Christ – i.e. as a person is moved from eternal “condemned” to “divinely pardoned” at conversion. 1347 (dikaíōsis) is the cognate in the dik- word-family which most closely aligns with the theological meaning of the term justification.”

 

For additional study see:  http://biblehub.com/greek/1347.htm

In the Beginnning (Genesis 1:1-2:7)

In the Beginnning (Genesis 1:1-2:7)

The Creation of the World

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.

And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.

And God said, “Let there be an expanse[a] in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters.” And God made[b] the expanse and separated the waters that were under the expanse from the waters that were above the expanse. And it was so. And God called the expanse Heaven.[c] And there was evening and there was morning, the second day.

And God said, “Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry land Earth,[d] and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good.

11 And God said, “Let the earth sprout vegetation, plants[e] yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind, on the earth.” And it was so. 12 The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed according to their own kinds, and trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, the third day.

14 And God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night. And let them be for signs and for seasons,[f] and for days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the expanse of the heavens to give light upon the earth.” And it was so. 16 And God made the two great lights—the greater light to rule the day and the lesser light to rule the night—and the stars. 17 And God set them in the expanse of the heavens to give light on the earth, 18 to rule over the day and over the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening and there was morning, the fourth day.

20 And God said, “Let the waters swarm with swarms of living creatures, and let birds[g] fly above the earth across the expanse of the heavens.” 21 So God created the great sea creatures and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarm, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 22 And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” 23 And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day.

24 And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to their kinds—livestock and creeping things and beasts of the earth according to their kinds.” And it was so. 25 And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds and the livestock according to their kinds, and everything that creeps on the ground according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.

26 Then God said, “Let us make man[h] in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.”

27 So God created man in his own image,
    in the image of God he created him;
    male and female he created them.

28 And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.” 29 And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food.30 And to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the heavens and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so. 31 And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

The Seventh Day, God Rests

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it God rested from all his work that he had done in creation.

The Creation of Man and Woman

These are the generations
of the heavens and the earth when they were created,
in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.

When no bush of the field[i] was yet in the land[j] and no small plant of the field had yet sprung up—for the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the land, and there was no man to work the ground, and a mist[k] was going up from the land and was watering the whole face of the ground— then the Lord God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature.

Footnotes:

  1. Genesis 1:6 Or a canopy; also verses 7, 8, 14, 15, 17, 20
  2. Genesis 1:7 Or fashioned; also verse 16
  3. Genesis 1:8 Or Sky; also verses 9, 14, 15, 17, 20, 26, 28, 30; 2:1
  4. Genesis 1:10 Or Land; also verses 11, 12, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, 30; 2:1
  5. Genesis 1:11 Or small plants; also verses 12, 29
  6. Genesis 1:14 Or appointed times
  7. Genesis 1:20 Or flying things; see Leviticus 11:19–20
  8. Genesis 1:26 The Hebrew word for man (adam) is the generic term for mankind and becomes the proper name Adam
  9. Genesis 2:5 Or open country
  10. Genesis 2:5 Or earth; also verse 6
  11. Genesis 2:6 Or spring
Word Wealth Category Introduction

Word Wealth Category Introduction

Have you ever encountered a term, while reading your Bible, and found yourself saying “what does this mean?” We frequently find, as Christians, that there are unique words that belong only to us and  it is important that we know them, understand what they mean, and apply them to our lives as regularly as is possible. To that end, we bring you Word Wealth.

Word Wealth wil use 3 Dictionaries, Thayer’s Greek-English New Testament Lexicon, Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old Testament and New Testament Words, and Strong’s Bible Dictionary to help you understand these important terms.

We will offer an new word every Wednesday for your consideration and growth.

Grace to you. May your study be enriched by the Holy Spirit

100 Passages Category Introduction

100 Passages Category Introduction

Since Bible study is essential to our lives as Christians, we want to provide 100 passages that every Christian should know. There will be 2 passages per week (Monday and Friday) to take you through the 100 passages of Scripture in one year.

These passages will not be guided self study. Instead, we will provide simply the text of the Scripture in the English Standard Version. 

As you read each passage, you are encouraged to have a note pad and a pen so that you can make notes as the Holy Spirit teaches you. If you are diligent, at the end of one year you will have a solid overview of the Bible, and, specifically, Redemptive History.

Grace to you. May your study be enriched by the Holy Spirit.

A Monster on a White Horse: The Beast from the Sea (Reveation 13)

A Monster on a White Horse: The Beast from the Sea (Reveation 13)

This lesson is a bit of a parenthetical as we look back to the Rider on the White Horse from the 1st Seal. Here, though, John gives us much more detail into the spirit behind the rider and the character of the rider as he describes the Beast from the Sea…

Where does this beast come from? John describes him as arising out of the sea, but we know that this is obviously not literal, so we must ask what this imagery means. In order to properly understand Revelation, we need to understand a little about Jewish literature. In Jewish literature, the sea is a metaphor for the Goyim (literally the nations) or as we call them, gentiles. The beast will come from the Gentile world. However, he also arises out of the abyss. In several passages, we see that the sea is also a metaphor for the abyss (Job 26:12; Psalm 74:13-14; 89:9-10; Isaiah 27:1), so the beast is also from the abyss.

A unique description paralleling the dragon

The old saying goes, “like father like son” and there is no one who will be more a son of Satan than the beast. If you look back to chapter 12, you will see that the dragon is also described as “having ten horns and seven heads, and on his horns were ten diadems.” Much as a son comes in the name and likeness of his father, so the beast will come in the name and likeness of his father, the devil.

Let’s consider some of the comments from the ESV Study Bible…

“As the dragon stands on the seashore (12:17), a beast emerges from the sea. This beast is sometimes identified with the Antichrist (1 John 2:18, 22; 4:3; 2 John 7) or the man of lawlessness (2 Thess. 2:3–12). Its blasphemous words and demand for worship reinforce the connections between these predictions of a final, future opponent to Christ’s reign. Yet the imagery of Daniel 7 that appears in the description of the beast shows that it represents not only a future individual but also present world powers that wage Satan’s war against the Lamb and his church. Most dispensationalists, and many other futurists, think the first beast (Rev. 13:1–10) is a political world leader and the second beast (vv. 11–18) is his religious counterpart, who enforces worship of the first beast.”

We need to be abundantly clear: The Antichrist Spirit is already at work in the world today, the system of lawlessness that will enable the Antichrist is present already, but the Antichrist (person) is not yet here. The Bible uses the term Antichrist to speak of a person, his kingdom, and the spirit behind them both.

Calling forward the imagery from the prophet, Daniel we see The beast looks like a leopard but has feet like a bear’s, a mouth like a lion’s mouth, and ten horns, and it wages “war on the saints” (v. 7). Thus it resembles all four beasts that Daniel saw emerge from the sea before the Son of Man appeared (Dan. 7:1–8, 21). As those beasts symbolized kingdoms (Dan. 7:17, 23), so this beast, a composite of them all, represents every human empire—Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Greece, Rome, and their successors—that demands absolute allegiance and trust, enforcing its demand with coercion. To be sure, the beast IS a person, but he is clearly associated with the fallen world system.

One of his heads was wounded as to death but the deadly wound was healed.

Literally, is says the head was slain to death. Talk about a show stopper. In a way which we do not yet know, the beast will suffer a fatal wound and die. He will be resurrected from that death and, at that point, declare himself to be God. Having parroted the defining moment in redemptive history, the beast will declare himself God and demand the whole world worship him. The technology exists today for the entire world to see these events and possibly watch them live. It will be no small wonder when the world follows after him. After all, dead men do not usually rise up and walk.

 

I am purposely ending the study notes, here. I do not want to fuel the rampant speculation and nonsense that frequently comes along with this chapter

ESV Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible

ESV Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible

 

Crossway has delivered some amazing Bibles, true works of art that make the Sacred Book a delight to read and to touch. I have owned a number of them and I have always been impressed but I don’t think any of Crossway’s Bibles have ever left me speechless…until now.

The ESV Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible is, I think, the perfect reader’s edition. (Note: this review was not solicited by either Crossway or EvangelicalBible.com and neither organization provided a review copy.) This Bible is available in five colors, three of which are exclusive to evangelicalbible.com. The exclusive colors are Ocean Blue (I am reviewing today), Purple, and Green. Black and Brown are available from both Evangelical Bible and Crossway.

A little from the publisher and then on to the review:

“The ESV Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible is a special edition of the original ESV Single Column Legacy Bible. Based on the Renaissance ideal of a perfect page, the Single Column Legacy Bible features a simple, clear layout with generous margins.

As with Crossway’s other Heirloom Bibles, the Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible is printed in the Netherlands on high-quality European Bible paper and features art gilding, three ribbon markers, and an extra-smooth sewn binding. This exclusive edition is available in green, purple, and blue goatskin covers. The Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible is a fine edition that combines elegant design with the best production materials available. Features include (Your art gilding and ribbon colors will vary depending on color purchased.):

  • Black letter text
  • 9 pt. font
  • 28 gsm paper
  • Single-column, paragraph format
  • Concordance
  • Art gilding (blue under gold)
  • Three ribbon markers (Navy)
  • Leather lined in dark blue
  • Sewn binding
  • Raised hubs on the spine”

 

 

The Reading Experience Part 1: The Perfect Page (design layout)

When Crossway released the original ESV Single Column Legacy Bible in 2012, they stated that the design was based on the Renaissance idea of a perfect page. I have to say that they have achieved this goal; even the most untrained eye can see the care that has gone into the layout. Subject headings are shifted to the outer margin and the gutter, even with translation footnotes is more than generous. A 9-point font came as a bit of a surprise; it is sufficiently large enough for reading in large blocks of time without your eyes getting tired and small enough to keep this Bible from becoming a behemoth. The layout of this Bible is so perfect, in fact, that it has caused me to no longer care about the major complaint I had on the original, tiny verse numbers. I find myself getting “lost” in the text and I love it. As a teacher, I forget, sometimes, that the Bible is meant to be read and enjoyed and there is none better, in my opinion, than the Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible. Simply look inside one and you will understand the joy that comes from reading the Bible. If I did not know better, I would swear that an ophthalmologist oversaw the design because it so perfectly caters to the human eye.

The Reading Experience Part 2: Paper and Font

The design layout is the most important feature of the Heirloom Single Column Legacy; it has to be because this a “Reader’s Bible.” I think we tend to forget that the Bible is literature. We know about its life changing power but we forget the literary experience of reading the Bible.

The Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible is one of the best in the reader’s category. Two major factors affecting this are the paper and font. Crossway chose a cream colored paper for this Bible, in fact they use cream colored paper in a number of their Bibles. I cannot say enough about how smart this decision was. Reading this Bible outside in the Arizona sunlight was absolutely no challenge at all. I also read in my office with my bright overhead lights and did my bedtime reading with a softer white light. The bedside reading took about 90 seconds for my eyes to adjust but that is more an issue with my eyes than this Bible.

At 28gsm the paper is quite thin but the opacity is amazing; I do not think that I had to deal with any show-through at all.

Verse numbers are quite muted, so much so that I find it very easy to “get lost” in the reading. To the best of my knowledge, the Heirloom SCL uses a Lexington font which, I believe makes a frequent appearance in Crossway’s lineup. The font in crisp and clean in a rich deep black. While discussing this Bible with a colleague, I was asked if a red-letter edition is available and, thankfully, the answer is no. In some cases, I do not mind a red-letter edition. Here, though, a red-letter edition would prove an unnecessary distraction.

The goatskin

The feel of goatskin is unmistakable on a Bible and the feel of this goatskin is even better. The grain is pronounced but not overly pronounced. When I run my fingers over it, it feels like every nerve in my fingertips is awakened. In truth this is probably the same goatskin as on my Allan NASB Reader, or my Cambridge Concord, or even my Schuyler ESV w/Confessions a fact which would be due to the fact that they are all bound by famed Bible bindery, Royal Jongbloed. However, it feels just a little different and I can’t explain why. The best way I can describe it is to say that it reminds me of my grandmother’s rocking chair, it feels already broken in and ready for me but at the same time new and ready to be with me for ages.

Just the right amount of ribbons

3 ribbons are, in my estimation, just the right amount; you get one for Old Testament Reading, one for Psalms and Proverbs, and one for your New Testament Reading. It is true that there are other reading plans which require a larger number of ribbons but for this Bible I cannot complain. 2 ribbons would not be enough and any more than three would be too many.

Minimalist helps

There really are not a ton of helps/study tools in the Single Column Legacy Series. There are translation footnotes, subject headings in the margins, and a concordance. Don’t let that disappoint you, though, as this edition is more about the quality of your personal worship reading than your study and lesson prep.

Leaving a legacy of faith in your legacy Bible

With legacy in its name, I would be hard pressed to pass up mentioning leaving a legacy of faith to your children or grandchildren. This is not a traditional wide margin Bible nor is it per se a journaling Bible and yet there is room on every page to do just exactly that. One of the most unique features of the Bible is the fact that, even though they all have the same words on the pages, God creates personal relationships, with His people, through the Bible. Keeping records of that relationship is an ideal choice for using the Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible so that, in the end, it will live up to its name and be an heirloom for your family.

How does the Heirloom Single Column Legacy Compare to others?

I do not wish to overburden you with a ton of comparisons, but there is one Bible that I would like to compare the Heirloom to, the Tyndale NLT Select Reference Bible. Both are single column and worthy of a place on your desk. The Select Reference features a slightly smaller 8.75-point font that is equally readable. Both Bibles feature exquisite goatskin from Jongbloed with a smythe sewn binding to ensure that they lay flat when opened.

The one “advantage” that is offered by the Select Reference would be the references in the outer margins, 40,000 in total but I’m not sure that really is an advantage. Both Bibles are spectacular and represent what I believe to be the pinnacle format from the respective publishers.

Why buy an Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible?

I am not even going to entertain the question of if you should buy, I think you should. Instead I want to summarize my thoughts as an explanation of why you ought to own an ESV Heirloom Single Column Legacy Bible.

  1. It is as perfect as you are going to get in terms of a reader’s Bible
  2. The craftsmanship guarantees that this Bible will live on in your family for generations.
  3. Using this edition will enhance your spiritual growth because you will consume larger portions of the Bible.

Overall Thoughts

If it is not obvious, I love it. Crossway offers a huge selection of Bibles, but for me this the best they offer. The ESV that I normally carry is the Schuyler ESV w/Confessions but I can say with confidence that this Bible will get plenty of use. As a matter of fact, I have been looking for a new primary translation for my audience and have narrowed the field to the ESV and the NLT and since I will be using both translations for different reasons, I think both the Heirloom Single Column Legacy and the Select Reference will end up being my main two Bibles for a while.

 

QSRG: The Ordo Salutis

QSRG: The Ordo Salutis

One of the most important topics a Christian will ever study is the Ordo Salutis, the Order of Salvation. When we study the Ordo Salutis, we are looking at the sequence of events in salvation leading up to the believer being glorified in Heaven. A Summary of the Ordo Salutis is found in Romans 8:29-30 and a more detailed Ordo Salutis will follow that.

Romans 8:29-30 (NIV)
29 For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. 30 And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified.
The full Ordo Salutis:

Election – God’s choice of a people to be saved took place before the world was made. (Ephesians 1:4)

Predestination – Election is God’s choice, and predestination is the pre-assigned destination marked out for those He chose, that being Heaven (Romans 8:29-30)

Outward Call/Gospel Call/Preaching of the word: saving faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of God (Romans 9:14, Romans 10:17)

Inward call: God the Holy Spirit speaks life to the elect’s dead human spirit, even as they hear the outward call of the gospel (1 Corinthians 1:22-24)

Faith: Belief and trust in the message of the gospel (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Conversion: One’s turning to God based on the gospel (Acts 26:18).

Perseverance: One’s continued true belief—remaining in the state of salvation (Jude 1:24).

Repentance: Changing one’s mind from rejection of Christ to faith in Christ (Acts 26:20).

Justification: God’s freeing of one from the penalty of sin—the pronouncement of “not guilty” on a sinner (Romans 5:9).

Sanctification: God’s separation of one from the lure of sin (2 Timothy 2:21).

Glorification: God’s final removal of all sin from the life and presence of one (in the eternal state) (Romans 8:18; 2 Corinthians 4:17).

CSB Study Bible Review

CSB Study Bible Review

This particular review has taken me a little longer than normal, not because there is anything wrong with the CSB Translation but because old habits die hard. The HCSB, predecessor to the CSB has been one of the translations that I have used for a number of years and I am trying to make it a main translation but after 21 years with NASB, old habits really do die hard.

 

The particular CSB that we are reviewing today is the CSB Study Bible in jacketed hardcover which was provided by B&H Publishing free of charge in exchange for an honest review.

 

The CSB Study Bible is an update to the HCSB version of the Holman Study Bible.

 

From the Publisher

The CSB Study Bible continues to offer the ECPA award winning Holman study system with all of its study notes and tools uniquely designed to be on the same page as the biblical text to which they refer. Newly expanded to offer additional word studies, feature articles on the apostles by Dr. Sean McDowell, and more.

The CSB Study Bible features the highly reliable, highly readable text of the Christian Standard Bible (CSB), which stays as literal as possible to the Bible’s original meaning without sacrificing clarity. The CSB’s optimal blend of accuracy and readability makes Scripture more moving, more memorable, and more motivating to read it today — and share it always.

For the growing believer whose desire is to know Scripture more intimately and live out its loving instruction, the CSB Study Bible always keeps you and God on the same page.

Features include:

  • 368 word studies to introduce you to the context and meaning behind key Greek and Hebrew words
  • High-quality smyth-sewn binding that will lie open whether you are reading Genesis 1 or Revelation 22
  • Full-color visuals to help you see the structure and context of Scripture come alive, including 94 photographs, 55 maps, 44 paintings, 21 illustrations/reconstructions, 19 charts, and 61 timelines
  • Introductions and outlines for each book, including background information, theological themes, and insights into the unique contribution of each book
  • Easy-to-read layout with two columns of text, center-column cross-references, and three columns of notes

 

Why do you need a study Bible?

A number of my colleagues do not care for study Bibles and I think this is a bit short sighted. The primary audience for a study Bible is a new disciple. Fully 95% of the Christians in America will not get the benefit of Bible College but will need resources to help them grow. A good study Bible, and this one is an excellent choice, will provide an excellent foundation for discipling a new believer.

Translation Choice

The CSB is what we would call a mediating translation, or to use B&H’s description, Optimal Equivalence. It is not strictly literal like the NASB nor is it an entirely meaning based translation like NIV or NLT. You will find the text to be literal where it needs to be and meaning based where it needs to be. All in all, I really like the translation and I will eventually replace my NASB and NIV with the CSB.

Study Notes

The study notes are conservatively estimated at 15,000 but I would say that we are closer to 20,000. The notes easily rival both the MacArthur and ESV Study Bibles, two of my favorites. They are very comprehensive and do not simply explain the text but they provide cultural and theological background as well.

The predecessor, HCSB, was often times called the “Hard Core Southern Baptist Bible” because it is copyrighted and published by a Southern Baptist entity. However, the notes are not strictly Southern Baptist, even less so now than in the preceding edition. I would say they are pretty much mainstream evangelical.

 

Hebrew and Greek Word Studies (CSB Only)

There are times when you need to go deeper into a word’s meaning to be able to interpret Scripture correctly. The CSB Version of the Holman Study Bible offers Hebrew and Greek Word Studies. A word study will feature the word, its pronunciation, how it is translated in the CSB, an explanation of the word’s use in the Bible. This is arguably my favorite feature in the Holman Study Bible. In the updated version we are treated to 315 Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic word studies.

 

The word studies do not take the place of learning any of the original languages but they are most helpful for a Sunday School Teacher or a younger pastor who wants to go a little more in-depth with the audience.

If there was to be one feature that would cause me to recommend this study Bible over some others, it would be the word studies.

 

Additional Helps

141 photos, 62 timelines, 59 maps, 40-page concordance, 20 articles and essays on practical and theological issues, 16 illustrations and reconstructions, and 15 charts all come together to make what is doubtlessly one of the best tools you can add to your library.

The photos bring Scripture to life in new ways as they enable visualization of the lands of the Bible that may have been hard to imagine before. The timelines bring the historical context into the Bible and the charts present key information in a systematic way for more practical study

Overall Impression

All in all, I like the CSB Study Bible. I would prefer the paper to be a little heavier so that I felt comfortable writing in it but that is simply a niggling little complaint. Despite snarky remarks from its detractors, there is not really any denominational or theological bias in the CSB Study Bible.

If this is going to be your main/only Bible, spend a little more and get a leather edition. There is nothing wrong with a hardcover but it will wear out faster than a leather edition will.

 

 

Jehovah’s (True) Witnesses

Jehovah’s (True) Witnesses

Text Revelation 11

 

One of the biggest mysteries in the Bible is the identity of the Two Witnesses in Revelation. I have heard them identified as being Enoch and Elijah (the only two men in the Bible who have never tasted death) and the late Dr. Tim LaHaye has identified them as, perhaps, being Moses and Elijah. Further many of my amillennialist friends identify them as being representative of Christians proclaiming (witnessing) Christ during the final days.

 

While I do not think these two are Moshe (Moses) and Eliyyahu (Elijah), spcifically, I do think that they are representative of the Law and the Prophets.

 

There are two reasons for my thinking the Two Witnesses are representative of the Law and Prophets: First, duplicates of miracles of Moses and Elijah and, secondly, Moses and Elijah representing Law & Prophets were at the Transfiguration. Let’s take a look…

 

Jesus as fulfillment Law and Prophets (Matthew 5:17): Jesus specifically tells us that He has come as the fulfillment of the both the Law and the Prophets.

 

Matthew 7:12, containing the Golden Rule, is the essence of both Law and Prophets. Hillel the Elder, a contemporary of Jesus stated that this verse is the whole Law and all the rest is commentary. I would go so far as to say that this is one of the foundational verse upon which the Christian Faith is built.

 

In Matthew 17, we see that Moshe and Eliyyahu join Jesus on the Mount of Transfiguration. Why are they there? The whole of the Old Testament, which was referred to as the Law and Prophets in the days of Jesus, point to Christ. Jesus spells this out directly in John 5:39,

 

“You search the Scriptures because you think they give you eternal life. But the Scriptures point to me!” (NLT)

 

The entire story of Scripture is the story of Redemptive History. Central to that Jesus the Redeemer and as Christ is about to undergo His final coronation as King of the Earth, having taken it back from the usurper, Satan, these witnesses point, a final time, to Christ. At the point that they are taken up to heaven in a cloud, the final choice will have been made. Men will have either chosen Christ or judgment.